SUMMER 2021 COVID-19 PLANNING

The information below will change and evolve as we get closer to camp. We’ll update this page as we receive final recommendations from the Vermont Department of Health and confirm our plans.

We are so excited to welcome campers and counselors back to camp this summer. Safety is our top priority—always—and we are taking extensive measures to create healthy camp communities for the entirety of our summer sessions.

As parents and families, you play an essential role in helping us create a safe summer community for all. Our expectation is that you will adhere to these guidelines. If any of the requirements pose a problem, please contact your Camp Director as soon as possible. Let’s all do our part to protect our camp and broader communities.

Important date change for Aloha, Hive, Lanakila: 1st session will end on Saturday 7/17 (not Sunday) and 2nd session will start on Monday 7/19 (not Tuesday). The Youth Leadership Program will also end on Saturday 7/17.

ALOHA, HIVE, LANAKILA, AND YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM – RESIDENTIAL CAMPS (updated 3/24/21)


Since spring 2020, we have been working closely with local, state, and national experts to establish guidelines and best practices for opening camps safely and limiting the spread of communicable disease.

All of our practices have been developed to meet or exceed guidelines put forth by the American Camp Association (ACA), the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and Vermont’s Department of Health.

Some of the Vermont state guidelines have not been finalized yet—for example, maximum group sizes allowed in indoor spaces, quarantine requirements, and testing protocols. We will update our protocols when we receive that information.


To minimize risk and protect our campers and counselors, we will be creating and maintaining a camp “bubble” on each of our campuses. This means we will not allow parents or other visitors at camp—only a few Aloha Foundation employees (the Executive Director, Nursing Supervisor, and Dining Services Manager, for example) will be permitted on campus.

Camp families consist of two adjacent tents or 1 cabin/shack—no more than 8 people. Campers do not need to wear masks with their camp families. There are several camp families of up to 8 people in each pod of up to 25. Campers will stay with their assigned pod for activities during the first week of camp or until everyone receives a negative PCR test.

Essential vendors—who need to deliver food or supplies, or handle maintenance or other needs—will wear masks, stay socially distanced, and follow specific procedures to avoid contact with campers and staff.


Yes, all campers will be required to arrive with negative PCR test results received within the last 72 hours and will need to sign a COVID-19 attestation regarding symptoms, travel, and exposure. Testing may be done in your home state prior to travel to Vermont. Testing is available in Vermont for families who plan to arrive in the state early. See the VT Dept of Health website for more information.


This part of the plan is absolutely critical for the success of camp this summer. We need everyone to arrive healthy! We are counting on everyone—parents, campers, and staff—to comply with the pre-camp low-risk behaviors. More than ever, in the weeks leading up to camp, we will lean on you to help us have a healthy summer.

  • Campers and members of their households should engage only in low-risk behaviors for 10-14 days before travel to camp. A rule of thumb is that low-risk behaviors are those that can be done outdoors and/or with masking and physical distancing.
  • Attending school, where masking and distancing are diligently employed, has not been shown to increase risk of COVID-19 and may be considered a low-risk behavior during this time.
  • Campers should only be unmasked with immediate household family members during this time, specifically not eating in restaurants or other eating venues with individuals outside their family unit. Large gatherings or groups outside the family household are not recommended. This includes weddings, graduations, religious gatherings, parties, and playdates. Families are encouraged to discuss their pre-camp plans with Camp Directors should there be any questions.

GREAT! We are hearing from campers and counselors that they cannot WAIT to be back at camp. When we ask them things like, “Well, how do you feel about wearing a mask sometimes?” Their resounding answer is we’re used to it, we don’t mind, and mostly: “TAKE ME TO CAMP ASAP!” We feel the same way!

Some things at camp will be different this summer and some will be the same.

Some of what will be different:

  • new COVID-19 safety guidelines, like wearing masks sometimes
  • staying in “camp families” during the first week of camp (2 adjacent tents or 1 cabin shack, no more than 8 people)
  • how we do some activities
  • fewer tables in the dining hall and some under a big tent for al fresco dining

Some of what will be the same:

  • laughter
  • fun
  • friendships
  • campfires
  • the lake
  • summer weather
  • enjoying the outdoors
  • lifelong memories

NPIs are Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions. Three standard ones we are using are:

  1. Staying outside
  2. Staying appropriately distanced
  3. Staying masked

Two out of three NPIs will be used throughout the summer when campers are not with their camp families.


Campers will not be required to wear masks when they are in their camp families.

Campers will wear masks when they are in groups larger than camp families and while moving around the campus. This includes entering the dining room, though campers and staff will be able to remove masks once they get to their table. A few specific department activities may require campers to wear a mask to meet the 2 out of 3 NPI guideline – or we may modify those activities to meet the 2 out of 3 NPI guideline so a mask is not required.

We anticipate asking each camper to bring at least 20 two-layer masks to allow used masks to be laundered each week. We will have extras available for those that need them.


Like the other information on this page, this answer may change over the course of the spring, but as of right now: If campers are doing activities outside and are appropriately distanced, they are adhering to the 2 out of 3 NPI guideline and do not need to wear masks. If they are participating in an indoor activity, they would need to wear a mask and maintain the minimum distance from others.

NPIs are Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions. Three standard ones we are using are: 1. Staying outside 2. Staying appropriately distanced 3. Staying masked. Two out of three NPIs will be used throughout the summer when campers are not with their camp families.


Right now, according to Vermont guidelines, we expect testing for campers to take place at these times:

  • Opening Day 1: campers arrive with negative PCR test results received within 72 hours (all campers)
  • Opening Day 1: rapid antigen test (all campers)
  • 7 days into first session: PCR test (all campers)
  • 3 days before first session ends: first session campers can opt-in for a PCR test prior to departure (sign up will be available in the parent portal)
  • Opening Day 2: campers arrive with negative PCR test results received within 72 hours (second session campers only)
  • Opening Day 2: rapid antigen test (second session campers only)
  • 7 days into second session: PCR test (all campers)
  • 3 days before second session ends: campers can opt-in for a PCR test prior to departure (sign up will be available in the parent portal)

Further testing will take place should anybody display COVID-19 symptoms. All PCR tests will be billed to a camper’s health insurance.


Second-session campers will follow the same plan as the first-session campers from Opening Day onward. They will be assigned a camp family of second-session campers and remain with their camp families during the first week of camp for meals and their assigned wash house/jinx time. They will remain with their assigned pods for activities.

Camp families have no more than 8 people and pods have no more than 25.


We expect transportation to and from camp to look different this year. As a COVID-19 precaution, we are asking all families to drop off and pick up their children by car, when possible.

We will not be able to pick campers up from buses or trains or meet arriving flights at airports.

We are not allowing campers to travel independently to camp this summer.

We do expect to be able to run several buses filled to 50% capacity from NYC to Vermont for Opening and Closing Days (June 23 and August 11) for Aloha, Hive, and Lanakila campers. You may sign up within the Parent Portal.

In addition to the NYC chartered bus, we may be able to offer additional, limited transportation options to campers whose parents are unable to pick them up at camp at the end of their session. Contact Karen Danforth to discuss your options.


Opening and Closing Days will be a little bit different this year. Each camp will have multiple drop-off zones on Opening Day, which will be staffed by a member of our health house team and camp staff. Families will be assigned a drop-off zone and a drop-off time and will leave their campers and luggage at the drop-off point. We expect drop-off to take about 20 minutes. We will do our best to coordinate drop-off times for families bringing campers to more than one camp. You may indicate your preferred time for drop-off within the Parent Portal. In order to administer rapid tests for campers, we will not be able to accommodate arrivals later than 5pm. Your assigned time will be shared with you closer to Opening Day. **Drop-off procedures for Youth Leadership Program will be a little different since there are fewer participants. Stay tuned for more information.

Parents and other visitors will not be permitted anywhere on campus other than the drop-off zone.

Each camper will be given a rapid antigen test on Opening Day. Parents will be asked to stay in the waiting area until a negative rapid antigen test is confirmed. If a camper’s rapid antigen test is positive, our camp doctor will conduct a PCR test and we will ask the camper and their family to stay in a nearby hotel until we get the PCR result back, hopefully 24 hours later. If the PCR result is negative, the camper will go to camp. If the PCR test is positive, the camper and their family will need to go home to quarantine and return in ten days.

We are excited for you to meet your child’s counselor! We will be introducing counselors to you before you arrive at camp. (Counselors will be in their units on Opening Day and not in the drop-off areas.)


We will have a no-visitor policy this summer to maintain each camp’s “bubble” environment. There will be no Show Weekend (parents’ weekend) during summer 2021, nor any visitors permitted on campus for picnics or other gatherings. In order to maintain our camp “bubble” campers will be unable to leave camp for any reason during their session.

Our closed-campus policy this summer extends to parents or other visitors who have received the COVID-19 vaccine. The primary focus of our directors and staff will be on the health, safety, and well-being of the camp community and the smooth operation of camp.

Vendors who need to deliver food or supplies, or handle maintenance or other needs, will wear masks, stay socially distanced, and follow specific procedures to avoid contact with campers and staff.


Yes. Activities will be organized into “zones” of 3-6 activities each. Campers will visit one zone at a time with their pods for either one or two activity periods. We are planning for all activities to be open this summer, following the 2 out of 3 NPI guideline.

We will not offer horseback riding at Hive this summer.


No. Our programs follow the guidance of the CDC. Imagine summer 2021 as made up of 4 non-equal phases (2 during first session and 2 during second session):

In the first phase (first week or so of camp), campers and counselors will stay in their camp families, made up of 2 adjacent tents or 1 cabin/shack (does not exceed 8 people). Everyone will stay with their camp families for meals and assigned wash house/jinx time. (At Hive and Aloha, bathrooms are called “jinxes” – a combination of “johns” and “sinks”). Campers do not need to wear masks with their camp families. During activity time, campers will be with larger, assigned pods. A pod is a group with a maximum of 25 people. (The new Youth Leadership Program will consist of 1 pod.)

In the second phase of camp (second part of first session), which starts once everyone has a negative PCR test, campers will participate in activities with others outside their pods.

In the third phase of camp (first part of second session), newly arriving second session campers will follow the same plan as first session campers did: they will stay with their camp families (of just second session campers) for the first week and their assigned pods for activities.

In the fourth phase of camp (second part of second session), which starts once everyone has a negative PCR test, campers will participate in activities with others outside their pods.

So a full-session camper would stay with their pod for activities during the first phase, and participate in activities with others outside of their pods for the remainder of the summer. A half-session camper would stay with their pod for activities for the first part of camp and then participate in activities with others for the rest of camp.


Limited overnight off-campus trips will take place on our five campuses or properties, and to select low-risk wilderness destinations.

We will not have any tri-camp gatherings for Aloha, Hive, and Lanakila this summer, such as our 4th of July celebration or All-Aloha Night. Each camp will have its own celebrations this year.

We are hoping that after at least two negative tests, campers may go to other camps for activities like ropes courses or to use specific spaces. They will not, however, be able to interact with campers on that site. Other than camp-sponsored activities, campers will not be allowed to leave and return to camp.


We are committed to offering delicious, nutritious, and varied food choices to our campers. Camp families will each have an assigned table. Each camp will have 10 tables under a marquee tent outdoors—the rest of the tables will be inside the dining room and distanced appropriately. All meals will be served family style and we will eliminate buffets and salad bars.

New handwashing stations are being built across all five campuses, which will allow everyone to wash their hands before entering the dining room. These will remain as permanent additions to camp.


Yes, definitely! Campers can have outdoor cookouts with their camp families and not wear a mask. Campers can also have cookouts with larger groups, with some accommodations to maintain the 2 of 3 NPI guideline.


Campers will wear masks when in the wash house/jinx, except during assigned time for camp families to shower and brush teeth. There will also be a handwashing station outside of each unit wash house.

Following guidelines from the American Camp Association (ACA), we will keep a record to track the frequency of cleaning for bathrooms, toilets, showers, communal spaces, and frequently touched surfaces.

*At Hive and Aloha, bathrooms are called “jinxes” (combination of “johns” and “sinks”).


We will follow American Camp Association (ACA) guidelines for cleaning and sanitizing, including logging how frequently spaces like bathrooms, toilets, communal spaces, and frequently touched surfaces are cleaned.

Housekeepers will receive specific training for cleaning and will be assigned to areas of campus where there are no campers or counselors present.

New handwashing stations are being built across our five campuses.


All staff participate in more than a week of intensive pre-camp training, including safety measures for preventing the spread of COVID-19.

At this time, we are strongly encouraging staff to get their COVID-19 vaccine before they come to camp. For those who do not have access or the opportunity to get vaccinated at home, we hope to be able to offer an option for staff to get vaccinated upon arrival at pre-camp.


If a camper has COVID-19 symptoms, they will be taken to the camp-specific isolation zone, which is separate from the Health House. The camper will have their own bedroom and will be cared for by a nurse.

The remainder of the pod will enter quarantine, which will be lifted once the camper displaying symptoms provides a negative test. During quarantine, the pod is restricted to specific designated areas around campus to ensure they do not encounter anyone outside of their pod. This includes time in the unit and taking meals away from the dining room.

If a positive test is produced the rest of the pod will be tested and remain in quarantine. Anybody providing a positive test will be moved immediately to isolation. At the end of this practice, those providing negative tests will come out of quarantine.

Parents will be notified if their camper has provided a positive PCR test or been exposed to someone who has.


Yes, we have hired one additional RN this summer to support our needs and new protocols. Each Health House has five staff this summer, including at least one RN on each site. There is also a central team of three (our Nursing Supervisor, new swing RN, and a Health House driver) to provide additional support where needed. **While there is no Health House dedicated to the Youth Leadership Program, our central team is available to provide healthcare to participants.

Upper Valley Pediatrics (UVP) will continue to serve as our camp doctors. Our arrangement includes a daily visit by a UVP doctor to each campus and assistance on Opening Day.

New in 2021 is our contract with Little Rivers for mental health consults.


Each camp has its own designated isolation zone. Campers (or counselors) displaying symptoms will immediately make their way to the tent outside of the isolation zone for a COVID-19 test. Campers will only be admitted inside the isolation zone upon returning a positive test.


If a camper’s rapid antigen test is positive for COVID-19 on Opening Day, our camp doctor will conduct a PCR test and we will ask the camper and their family to stay nearby (in a hotel or other self-arranged accommodation) until we get the PCR result back, hopefully 24 hours later. If the PCR result is negative, the camper will go to camp. If the PCR test is positive, the camper and their family will need to go home to quarantine and return in ten days.


In this case, we will follow CDC quarantine protocols: the camper would need to stay home for 10 days from the day the positive test result was received. They will then follow the same protocol as on the original Opening Day: the camper will be required to arrive at camp with negative PCR test results received within the last 72 hours and will need to sign a COVID-19 attestation regarding symptoms, travel, and exposure.


Any question you have is a valid one. Don’t hesitate to reach out!

Questions about transportation, arrival/departure, uniforms, camp forms, or other logistics? Please contact:

Karen Danforth, Associate Director of Enrollment

Any other questions? Contact your Camp Director:

Sarah Gordon Littlefield, Aloha Director

Ellie Thompson Pennell, Hive Director

Bryan Partridge, Lanakila Director

Jeremy Cutler, Youth Leadership Program

HORIZONS – DAY CAMP (updated 3/31/21)


Since spring 2020, we have been working closely with local, state, and national experts to establish guidelines and best practices for opening camps safely and limiting the spread of communicable disease.

All of our practices have been developed to meet or exceed guidelines put forth by the American Camp Association (ACA), the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and Vermont’s Department of Health.

Some of the Vermont state guidelines have not been finalized yet—for example, maximum group sizes allowed in indoor spaces, quarantine requirements, and testing protocols. We will update our protocols when we receive that information.


  • We will require low-risk behavior before and during camp for staff, campers, and their households. Clear details will be provided for camp families, but a general rule of thumb is that low-risk behaviors are those that can be done outdoors and/or with masking and physical distancing.
  • Parents/Families will complete a daily health summary for their camper(s).
  • Temperature checks and confirmation of daily health summary will occur at bus stops, and at a designated drop-off point for those arriving by car.
  • 2 out of 3 NPIs (non-pharmaceutical interventions) will be used throughout the summer: 1. stay outside 2. stay 6 feet apart (or distance recommended by the CDC) 3. stay masked.
  • Buses will operate at 50% capacity. Bus windows will be partially down in all weather. Campers will have assigned seats and will wear masks on the bus.
  • Campers and counselors will be assigned to two distinct groups within camp as follows.
    • 1 camper group = 2 or 3 counselors and up to 11 campers
    • 1 pod includes two camper groups, no pod will exceed a total of 25 people.
    • Campers will not interact with others outside of their pod. As a result, campers will only ever participate in activities with their own pod throughout their time at camp.
  • We will not offer food service this year. Campers will bring their own lunches, snacks, and water bottles.

Campers will follow the 2 of 3 NPI guidelines. (NPIs are non-pharmaceutical interventions and the three we are using are 1. outside 2. 6 feet apart or the distance the CDC recommends 3. masked.) So if they are outside and physically distanced appropriately, they do not need to wear a mask. If the activity requires them to be in closer proximity to each other, they would be required to wear a mask.

We anticipate asking each camper to wear a clean two-layer mask each day to camp and have a clean spare mask in their backpack. We will have extras available for those that need them. See the full packing list for Horizons online.


Yes, we know that bus transportation is essential for many families whose children attend Horizons and will be offering this service again this summer. See more information about the bus online and sign up within the Parent Portal.

In order to allow for appropriate social distancing, we will run more than one bus at 50% capacity this year. Counselor bus chaperones will take all campers’ temperatures and confirm their daily health before they board the bus. Bus windows will be partially down in all weather. Campers will have assigned seats and will wear masks on the bus. The bus route will include the usual stops in Lebanon, Norwich, Lyme, and Thetford.


We will have a closed-campus policy this summer to minimize the safety risk at Horizons. No parents or other visitors will be allowed on campus, other than for dropping off and picking up campers in designated areas.

We will not host Final Fridays (end-of-session assemblies for families) or our annual Horizons Family Day, where campers and their families are invited to Horizons on a weekend day in the summer and are encouraged to bring a friend who might be interested in learning more about camp. We look forward to bringing back these events in 2022 and beyond!

Our closed-campus policy this summer extends to parents or other visitors who have received the COVID-19 vaccine. The primary focus of our directors and staff will be on the health, safety, well-being of the camp community and the smooth operation of camp.

Vendors who need to deliver supplies, or handle maintenance or other needs, will wear masks, stay socially distanced, and follow specific procedures to avoid contact with campers and staff.


Yes. Eight activity departments will be open and ready for camper fun! These are archery, swimming, field games, arts & crafts, boating (canoeing and kayaking), court sports, drama, and nature. We will have a few new activities added this summer too – stay tuned!

Four of our activities – sailing, gymnastics, tripping (hiking), and the ropes course – pose safety concerns related to social distancing, sanitizing, or location. Because of this increased risk to campers, we will not be offering those activities this summer.

We will not have all-camp activities, organized singing, or assemblies at Horizons this summer.


No, we will be staying on the Horizons campus this year and not traveling to other locations for hiking trips or the ropes course, for example. The good news is that the Horizons campus is located right on Lake Fairlee and has over 150 acres of fields, woodlands, and trails. So much room to explore!


No, we will not offer an overnight option this year.


No, we will not provide food service this summer because of various challenges it presents (such as dining hall capacity, social distancing, food service safety, indoor space needs in case of inclement weather, etc.). Campers will bring their own lunches, snacks, and water bottles. See the full Horizons packing list here.


We will follow American Camp Association (ACA) guidelines for cleaning and sanitizing, including logging how frequently spaces like bathrooms, toilets, communal spaces, and frequently touched surfaces are cleaned.

Housekeepers will receive specific training for cleaning and will be assigned to areas of campus where there are no campers or counselors present.

New handwashing stations are being built across our five campuses.


We have capped enrollment this year to ensure we have suitable indoor program space during inclement weather. Each pod will have an assigned indoor space for bad weather. These areas will be well ventilated AND all campers and staff will be required to wear a mask.


Vaccine information and availability is changing rapidly so we are monitoring this area closely.

At this time, we are strongly encouraging staff to get their COVID-19 vaccine before they come to camp. For those who do not have access or the opportunity to get vaccinated at home, we hope to be able to offer an option for staff to get vaccinated upon arrival at pre-camp.

All staff participate in one week of pre-camp training, including safety measures for preventing the spread of COVID-19.


Horizons has a designated isolation zone. If a camper or counselor displays COVID-19 symptoms, they will attend the isolation zone while we arrange their departure from camp. The individual will not be able to return until cleared by a doctor or upon receipt of a negative COVID-19 PCR test.


Any question you have is a valid one. Don’t hesitate to reach out!

Questions about transportation, camp forms, sessions changes, or other logistics? See our Horizons 2021 page for more info or contact:

Karen Danforth, Associate Director of Enrollment

Any other questions? Contact:

Stuart Fairbairn, Horizons Director

OHANA – FAMILY CAMP (updated 4/1/21)


Since spring 2020, we have been working closely with local, state, and national experts to establish guidelines and best practices for opening camps safely and limiting the spread of communicable disease.

All of our practices have been developed to meet or exceed guidelines put forth by the American Camp Association (ACA), the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and Vermont’s Department of Health.

Some of the Vermont state guidelines have not been finalized yet—for example, maximum group sizes allowed in indoor spaces, quarantine requirements, and testing protocols. We will update our protocols when we receive that information.


To minimize risk and protect our community, we will be creating and maintaining a camp “bubble” at Ohana. This means we will not allow visitors at camp—only a few Aloha Foundation employees (the Executive Director, Nursing Supervisor, and Dining Services Manager, for example) and designated Ohana staff and vendors will be permitted on campus.

In order to maintain our camp bubble, campers will be asked to avoid or limit their trips off campus as much as possible during their week stay.

Essential vendors—who need to deliver food or supplies, or handle maintenance or other needs—will wear masks, stay socially distanced, and follow specific procedures to avoid contact with campers and staff.


This part of the plan is absolutely critical for the success of camp this summer. We need everyone to arrive healthy! We are counting on all participants to comply with the pre-camp low-risk behaviors. More than ever, in the weeks leading up to camp, we will lean on you to help us have a healthy summer.

Campers will be asked to participate in only low-risk behaviors for at least 10 days prior to arrival at camp. Low-risk behaviors are those that can be done outdoors and/or with masking and physical distancing.

Campers should only be unmasked with immediate household family members during this time, specifically not eating in restaurants or other eating venues with individuals outside their family unit. Large gatherings or groups outside the family household are not recommended. This includes weddings, graduations, religious gatherings, parties, and playdates.

If you are traveling to camp in a personal vehicle (including a rental car), Vermont guidelines currently require you to quarantine at home for 7 days before traveling and then provide a negative PCR test from your home state upon arrival at camp.

If you are traveling to camp using public transportation (plane, bus, train), you must quarantine for 7 days in Vermont and provide a negative PCR test upon arrival at camp. Campers are not permitted to quarantine at Ohana.

Current Vermont guidelines allow for fully vaccinated people (it has been 14 days since your final vaccine dose) to visit the state without quarantining. Each member of your family or group would need to be fully vaccinated for this to apply.


Yes. Campers and staff will be asked to follow all VT state requirements for travel and to use the most direct route to camp, taking as few stops as possible. Campers arriving from out of state or by plane will need to follow state-mandated requirements.

For families attending with one adult, we will ask you to confirm an emergency contact. This is a precaution we have in place each summer and will be even more important this year.


Campers may arrive no earlier than 4:00 pm on their arrival day. Departure will be by 9:00 am on the final day. We must allow time for staff to properly clean and prepare the campus for the next group of campers. Campers will be reminded to follow all the mandated state requirements of any state they will be entering after departure.


Yes. All campers will be required to arrive with certification of a negative PCR test received within the last 72 hours and will need to sign a COVID-19 attestation regarding symptoms, travel, and exposure.

It is possible—though not yet confirmed—that Ohana campers will be able to bring their COVID-19 vaccination cards with them instead of providing a negative PCR test. We are awaiting more guidance from the CDC on this and expect to know more in May.


PCR testing will take place should anybody display COVID-19 symptoms.


Campers do not need to wear masks when they are with their families or eating meals.

They will need to wear masks at other times. This summer, we’ll be using the 2 out of 3 NPI guideline. NPIs are non-pharmaceutical interventions and the three we’ll be using are: 1) staying outside 2) staying appropriately distanced (6 feet or the distance the CDC recommends) 3) staying masked. Campers will need to follow 2 of the 3 NPIs at all times. Meaning, if a camper is outside and appropriately distanced, a mask is not necessary. If a camper is indoors, they would need to stay appropriately distanced and wear a mask.

Each Ohana camper should bring at least 6 two-layer masks to camp and have spares on hand. We will have extras available for those that need them.


Yes. We will have zones on campus that are made up of several activities each and families will go to an activity zone together. For example, the south zone could include archery, tennis, basketball, and yoga. The Art Barn zone could include different activities happening in the upstairs, downstairs, porch, and field.

Each department (including the waterfront) will have specific restrictions on how many families may attend at any given time.

Most of our typical activity areas will be open this summer, following NPI guidelines (2 out of 3). Some elements of programs will look different, like modifying capture the flag so we can keep distance and still have fun.

In order to maintain our camp bubble, however, we will not travel to other campuses to do activities like the ropes course or climbing wall.


No. We are planning to have those indoor spaces closed but will have a system for families to requests books and games to borrow.


All meals will be served family style this year.

In order to reduce the number of diners at any given meal, we will rotate the families who dine at the Main Lodge (either on the porch or inside) and those who have meals delivered to their cabin or waterfront.


If you’d like to spend time with another family in particular, let us know so we can keep this in mind when we are making assignments and put your groups together.


We will follow American Camp Association (ACA) guidelines for cleaning and sanitizing, including logging how frequently spaces like bathrooms, toilets, communal spaces, and frequently touched surfaces are cleaned.

Housekeepers will receive specific training for cleaning and will be assigned to areas of campus where there are no campers or counselors present.
New handwashing stations are being built outside of the lodge so that there is ample opportunity for handwashing.


Vaccine information and availability is changing rapidly so we are monitoring this closely.

At this time, we are strongly encouraging staff to get their COVID-19 vaccine before they come to camp. For those who do not have access or the opportunity to get vaccinated at home, we hope to be able to offer an option for staff to get vaccinated upon arrival at pre-camp.

All staff participate in one week of pre-camp training, including safety measures for preventing the spread of COVID-19.


If a camper presents symptoms, the entire family will enter quarantine in their cabin. Our Nursing Supervisor (or designee in her absence) will provide a rapid test.

If there is a positive COVID-19 case, we will follow Vermont state guidelines for reporting and, for example, provide information for contact tracing. Campers with a positive test will have a designated isolation cabin to use. An adult may choose to stay in the isolation cabin alone. If the camper is under age 18, a responsible adult must enter isolation with them to provide care. Families may also choose to return home if they wish, once we have completed any necessary steps required by the state of Vermont.


Ohana Camp will have its own designated isolation cabin. People displaying symptoms will be asked to remain in their cabin with their family to await a COVID-19 test. Patients will only be admitted inside the isolation cabin upon returning a positive test.


While we hope this is not the case, if there were COVID-19 cases spreading through camp, we would ask families to all enter quarantine within their cabin or depart from Ohana.


Any question you have is a valid one. Don’t hesitate to reach out!
Vanessa Riegler, Executive Director
(802) 333-3460

COMMUNITY MESSAGES

RESOURCES